Conflict in Ukraine: a tragedy for children and their families

At the regional perinatal center in Kyiv, Ukraine, Yuliya, 38, holds her newborn baby Vera as she sits on a bed in a makeshift ward in the basement of the center days after the birth.  March 7, 2022

At the Regional Perinatal Center in Kyiv, Ukraine, Yuliya, 38, holds her newborn baby Vera as she sits on a bed in a makeshift ward in the basement of the center days after the birth. ” It’s frightening to see the smoke and shelling. We do everything to save our children and our future ‘ says the young woman. It took Yuliya two days of walking to get here from her house. As the conflict escalated, Yuliya had no choice but to try to find a safe place for her child to be born. With tears she says: I just want us all to stay alive […]. i want the paymentx. »

While waiting for a friend to pick them up to take them to Moldova, Maria and her daughter are resting in a room

As for Maria, she left home with her 3-year-old daughter Ksenyna when the fighting got within a few hundred meters of their home. ” I do all this for my daughter. It was far too dangerous to stay “. She finds herself relieved to have escaped to safety with her daughter confronted with fears and insecurities. « I had a job before but now I have no idea what to do, I have nothing “. While waiting for a friend to pick them up to take them to Moldova, Maria and her daughter are resting in a room “Blue Dots” supported by UNICEF. These “Blue Dots” or “Blue Dots” are distributed in Ukraine and neighboring countries, including Polandthe Romaniathe Moldova and the Belarus. They take in displaced children and families and take care of them: our teams provide them with water, food, clothing, medicine, hygiene items (nappies, pads, wipes, soap, etc.) and psychological support.

Iryna fled the conflict in Ukraine to Romania with her daughters Dasha, 5, and Masha, 8.  Photo taken on March 5, 2022.

Irina fled the Ukraine conflict to Romania with her daughters Dasha, 5, and Masha, 8. They couldn’t take much with them: a little food, some medicine and clothes, and a simple school bag filled with books to keep the little ones occupied. ” I used to run a clothing store in Odessa…but now I can’t imagine what’s going on there. I said [à mes filles] that we are going on vacation for several weeks “Iryna tells us to try to calm her down.

These testimonies reflect many testimonies that we have been able to collect. A real sense of trauma and distress is palpable as families describe in a matter of minutes how their lives have been turned upside down by the conflict.

UNICEF calls for a ceasefire in Ukraine

More than half of Ukraine’s children have been displaced after a month of conflictT and the situation is getting worse by the minute.

On the ground, UNICEF teams work tirelessly to help thousands of families and children in a variety of areas: access to waterlsanitation and sanitation, access to food and health care and benefit from psychosocial support for those who need it. We plan Establishment of 26 “Blue Dots” – each with the capacity to support 3,000 to 5,000 people per day and per location – in Moldova, Romania, Belarus, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Our priority is to protect children and avoid trauma.

Donate to UNICEF to help children in Ukraine

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